Archives For Short Film

I notice things- small things. Taking the time to notice symbolism in the world can bring a great delight. In films, which mimic the real world, I believe the importance of representing the person, theme and feel of a scene through proper prop selection is essential to the overall effectiveness of the message.

A prop is a small tool in the use of telling an overall story. Some may be more essential for the script that another, but each one can tell its own story and create more depth to the overarching thread. Continue Reading…

Fantasy films are so much fun to create and watch, but so freaking expensive! I had no idea my imagination was going to cost so much money when I was writing Avarice, but once we sat down to really think about what we needed to sell this world, I started thinking that maybe creativity was overrated.

However, I quickly learned that creativity is not just about coming up with new and interesting ideas. It’s also about how to make those ideas into a reality. Here are some cost efficient ways to turn your imagination into a world you can share with others. Continue Reading…

Effects shots are incredibly tedious.

In my short film Avarice, we have over 180 visual effects elements and it’s only a 12 minute film. We have been in post-production with this film for about 8 months, and the only visual effects shots that are completed as of now are two shots of opening titles. Visual effects take quite a bit of time to complete, even if you have someone who is very skilled and talented in the area. Continue Reading…

What a character is wearing is the quiet language that speaks throughout the film, even when no line is given. Many things are said through a garment, the color, texture, fabric weight, style and condition.

There are messages that we say about ourselves everyday when we dress. Some of us take more care then others in what we wear, whatever care does or does not go into what we wear, we are communicating some message. Continue Reading…

Working with kids can seem overwhelming at first, but as long as you figure out what makes them tick and learn about their little worlds, it’s not quite so difficult. Continue Reading…

I am not a filmmaker. Through the strange twists and turns of my life I have somehow ended up here, in Memphis, TN, spending the majority of my time with filmmakers. I like to think of myself as a pretty confident and competent person. Well…that was until I set foot on a film set. It was a set for a short-film and we were only in Dan Baker’s garage, but I’ve never felt more useless in my life. Continue Reading…

Whatever the story, a film contains a world for the viewer to explore. Creating a world for the characters and the ones invited in on the story is one of the most exciting things I like about production design.

Being able to imagine, dream and visualize then bring that into reality is a powerful thing to share. Everything begins somewhere. The idea is to first know what seed exists to know how to grow from it in imagination. Establishing or discovering the overarching theme is the first goal. Continue Reading…

We’re a little late on this one, I’ll admit. The plan was to pass around a chain email and review a film (or in this case, a collection of shorts) as a group, offering our differing perspectives and views. Buuuuut our group is composed primarily of right-brained artist types…who aren’t typically known for following through on things. Sorry.

For your consideration, I give you our group review of the 2012 Oscar Nominated Live Action Short-Films: Pentecost, Raju, Time Freak, The Shore and Tuba Atlantic:

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I just watched The Artist, and I was pleasantly surprised by how mesmerized I was after the first ten minutes. It didn’t feel odd to me at all that the audience could hear no dialogue. We didn’t need to. Everything that needed to be said was said through the picture and the acting. People say a picture is worth a thousand words, and that was definitely true for The Artist. Continue Reading…

[16:9] Kony 2012

Dan Baker —  March 14, 2012

Project 16:9 features films with a destination, whether it be an awareness driven documentary or a question-raising narrative. Right or wrong, these films have a destination clearly in mind.

Let’s make Joseph Kony famous!

I saw it first here: Derek Webb re-tweeting Jason Bateman. Within minutes, Facebook was ablaze with Kony fever. At 93-million views on YouTube and Vimeo as of this writing, filmmakers and advocates Invisible Children seem well on their way to making Joseph Kony the most talked about man on the planet. Continue Reading…